THE SUPERVISOR AND OSHA

While impacting on the entire organizations, OSHA also places certain responsibilities on the supervisor. OSHA requires that the supervisor keep very specific records. These include (1) OSHA Form 200 (Log and Summary of Occupational Injuries and Illnesses). Each recordable occupational injury and illness must be recorded in this form within six working days from the time the employer learns of the accident or illness. (2) OSHA Form 101 (Supplementary Record of Occupational Injuries and Illness). This form contains much more detail about each injury or illness that has occurred. It must also be completed within six working days from the time the employer learns of the accident or illness. Only those injuries and illnesses resulting in deaths, lost workdays, loss of consciousness, restriction of work or motion, transfer to another job, or medical treatment (other than first aid) must be reported, Injuries requiring temporary first aid do not have to be recorded. Substitute forms are allowed for both Form 200 and Form 101 under certain conditions.

Supervisors are frequently asked to accompany OSHA officials while they inspect an organization`s physical facilities. Because many organizations and supervisors feel threatened by an OSHA inspection, it is natural to want to be antagonistic. However, it is in the best interests of the supervisor to be cooperative with the OSHA officials. An uncooperative supervisor could cause OSHA officials to be more hard-nosed than usual. The end result could be stiffer penalties imposed by OSHA.

Supervisors should be familiar with the OSHA regulations affecting their departments. They should constantly be on the lookout for safety violations. As previously discussed, it is the supervisor`s responsibility to see that all safety rules are followed by the employees. This would naturally include all OSHA rules and regulations.


Indicate whether each of the following statements is true or false by writing "T" or "F" in the space provided.

  1. Most safety programs are designed to teach employees to react quickly in an unsafe situation.
  2. Even in organizations that have a safety director, supervisors have responsibility for seeing that the safety directives are carried out.
  3. Each individual state has responsibility for seeing that the Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHA) is enforced.
  4. OSHA requires that the supervisor keep very specific records.
Answers
  1. False. Most safety programs are geared toward accident prevention and not how to react to accidents.
  2. True. Although supervisors do not usually develop the safety procedures and rules, they are the ones who must see that they are carried out.
  3. False. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration of the U.S. Department of Labor enforces OSHA.
  4. True. These required forms include (1) OSHA Form 200 (Log and Summary of Occupational Injuries and Illnesses) and (2) OSHA Form 101 (Supplementary Record of Occupational Injuries and Illnesses).


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